Canada Type News | October 2013

Font Releases:

-Lapis Pro: Lapis was Jim Rimmer's venture into a territory he'd earlier explored with his Lancelot and Fellowship faces. This time he stayed much longer, dug pretty deep and had plenty of fun doing it. The end result is the kind of mosaic of influences only a guy like Jim could consider, gather, manage and apply in a way that ultimately makes sense and works as a type family. On the surface Lapis seems like something that can be billed as what Jim would have called an "advertising text face". But under the hood, it's a whole other story. On top of the calligraphic, nib-driven base Jim usually employed in his faces, Lapis shows plenty of typographic traits from a variety of genres, from Egyptian to Latin, from blackletter angularity to Dutch-like curvature, with an overall tension even reminiscent of wood type. There are some Goudy-informed shapes that somehow fit comfortably within all this. Then it's all strung together with a mix of wedged, tapered and leaning serifs that are placed with precision to reveal expert spontaneity and a great command of guiding the forms through counterspace. This newly remastered edition of the fonts has been refined and expanded across the board to include small caps, alternates, ligatures, ordinals, case-sensitive forms, six kinds of figures, automatic fractions, and a character set that covers an extended range of Latin languages. Each of the Lapis Pro fonts contains over 760 glyphs. View Lapis Pro

-Dutch Mediaeval Pro ST: Dutch Mediaeval Pro ST is a special version of the popular Dutch Mediaeval Pro family, engineered specifically for science writing. It is equipped with SciType, a combination of additional characters and OpenType programming included in the fonts to help in typesetting science text. For more information about SciType, please consult the SciType FAQ (PDF). The Dutch Mediaeval design is the historically renown one made in 1912 by S. H. de Roos. It stands out as one of the most classic Dutch text faces. This digital version comes in two weights and their italic counterparts. Aside from the SciType additions, all the fonts contain OpenType features for small caps and caps-to-small-caps, ligatures, ordinals, automatic fractions, seven kinds of figures, and a few ornaments. For details about the functionality of Dutch Mediaeval Pro ST, please consult its Access Chart (PDF). View Dutch Mediaeval Pro ST

-Roos ST: Roos ST is a special version of the Roos family, engineered specifically for science writing. It is equipped with SciType, a combination of additional characters and OpenType programming included in the fonts to help with typesetting science text. For more information about SciType, please consult the SciType FAQ (PDF). The Roos design is the Dutch classic made by S. H. de Roos during the years of the second World War, and subsequently used for a special edition of the Dutch Constitution on which Juliana took the oath during her inauguration as the Queen of the Netherlands. This design is widely regarded as de Roos's finest, and has one of the most beautiful italics ever drawn. Aside from the SciType additions, all the Roos ST fonts contain OpenType features for ligatures, ordinals, automatic fractions, and seven kinds of figures. For details about the functionality of Roos ST, please consult its Access Chart (PDF). View Roos ST

-Filmotype Hemlock: Our 22nd contribution to the ongoing revival of the Filmotype library. This one's a connected upright alphabet with funky dents and eye-catching wrist twists. Filmotype Hemlock is the kind of morning person that just oozes bouncy fun, promises plenty of joy. Resurrecting this baby from the grimy film strips of 1952 was a bit of a pain, but you know how we alphabeauticians crave a challenge. So now this font comes with lots o' ligatures, alternates, ordinals, automatic fractions, a huge variety of figures, and comprehensive support for Latin languages. View Hemlock (Filmotype)

October 2013 Notes:

- So now we have three SciType fonts. If that stuff has your attention and you happen to be in Asmterdam for the upcoming ATypI conference this month, check out Hans van Maanen's SciType talk. It should be an eye-opening experience about how this whole thing works around the long-standing divergence of type technologies and science writing.